Kenya Women's team podium during the IAAF/Cardiff University World Half Marathon Championships on March 26, 2016 in Cardiff, Wales (Photo by Jordan Mansfield/Getty Images for IAAF)

Kenya’s Peres Jepchirchir took the gold medal in the women’s race at the IAAF/Cardiff University World Half Marathon Championships in Cardiff, Wales on Saturday March 26.

, who was making her second appearance ever for Kenya after failing to finish at the 2014 Africa XC Championships in Kampala, led a Kenyan sweep of the podium at Cardiff 2016.

The 22-year-old outsprinted her compatriot to win the title, stopping the clock at 1:07:31.

Cynthia Limo, the world leader, who was making her maiden appearance for Kenya, clocked 1:07:34 to settle for silver ahead of the 2014 World Half silver medallist Mary Wacera Ngugi, who settled for bronze in 1:07:54 to complete the podium.

For the second successive edition, Ethiopia‘s was the best non-Kenyan finisher.

Gudeta was sixth in Copenhagen two years ago and finished fourth here in , clocking 1:08:01. Another Ethiopian clocked 1:08:15 for fifth.

Peres Jepchirchir now joins the likes of Tegla Loroupe, , and , as Kenyans who have won the title.

“The race was not bad,” said Jepchirchir after the race. “The course was good but I struggled a bit climbing the hill.”

Women's team medallists during the IAAF/Cardiff University World Half Marathon Championships on March 26, 2016 in Cardiff, Wales (Photo by Jordan Mansfield/Getty Images for IAAF)

Women’s team medallists during the IAAF/Cardiff University World Half Marathon Championships on March 26, 2016 in Cardiff, Wales (Photo by Jordan Mansfield/Getty Images for IAAF)

Team titles

Gladys Chesire and 2012 World Half bronze medallist Pascalia Chepkorir Kipkoech finished sixth and seventh in 1:08:48 and 1:09:44 respectively to ensure that Kenya retained the team title for the sixth time in the past eight editions.

Ethiopia’s Dehininet Demsew finished in eighth place while Peru’s Gladys Tejeda set a South American record of 1:10:14 in ninth position.

Kenya’s aggregate time of 3:22:59 is the second-fastest in the history of the championships.

Ethiopia, team winners in the past two Olympic years, was second in Cardiff 2016. And for the ninth successive edition, Japan took team bronze.